Writing up the logistics for my genetic fly screen; losin’ my mind

Going here tomorrow. puck yeah.

nonaviannerd:

deconversionmovement:

Meet the Original Birds in a Field Guide to Winged Dinosaurs

Has any paleontological discovery of the 21st century been so transformative as the fact that dinosaurs were feathered?

Sure, biologists still have academically foundational arguments over the proper positions of various protoplasmic goos at the tree of life’s trunk, but what shakes the trunk doesn’t always sway the branches. Not like dinosaurs — the charismatic megafauna of our collective childhood imaginations, now with feathers.

The dinosaur history books have literally been redrawn, and among the artists is Matthew Martyniuk, author and illustrator of the Field Guide to Mesozoic Birds and Other Winged Dinosaurs. Inside, using the field guide format that’s introduced so many people to nature, he introduces readers to dozens of dinosaurs that lived in the strange evolutionary junction between dino and bird.

"I’ve always been interested in bird evolution. It seemed there were so many books illustrating prehistoric animals, but none focusing on bird origins," said Martyniuk. "A lot of their characteristics go pretty deep into what were traditionally considered dinosaurs, and are really making us rethink how they would have looked in real life."

On the following pages, Martyniuk takes Wired on a tour of his dino-bird world.

Continue Reading

This is a fantastic book!

Winner of the BioArt!        
Cartilaginous fishes such as sharks, skates, and rays are the most primitive jawed vertebrates and are important species for the study of evolutionary developmental biology.  This image depicts an embryonic Little Skate, Leucoraja erinacea, sitting atop its yolk sac. The external gills appear as red strands extending from the underside of the embryo. This skate embryo is part of a research project investigating sexually dimorphic fin development and the origin of internal fertilization. This picture was taken by a  Katherine O’Shaughnessy, a graduate student working in the Cohn Lab at the University of Florida.

Winner of the BioArt!
Cartilaginous fishes such as sharks, skates, and rays are the most primitive jawed vertebrates and are important species for the study of evolutionary developmental biology. This image depicts an embryonic Little Skate, Leucoraja erinacea, sitting atop its yolk sac. The external gills appear as red strands extending from the underside of the embryo. This skate embryo is part of a research project investigating sexually dimorphic fin development and the origin of internal fertilization. This picture was taken by a Katherine O’Shaughnessy, a graduate student working in the Cohn Lab at the University of Florida.

How do i keep getting followers even though I only post like once a month? thanks a lot everyone. I’ll try to make it a point to post more often. You all rule!

Sequential and Rhythmic Production of Somites//

Illustrated with the developing zebrafish embryo, somitogenesis is a sequential and rhythmic process that subdivides the mesoderm of the vertebrate embryo. The segmented nature of future vertebrae and body muscles can be appreciated from their chevron-shaped embryonic precursors. This timelapse movie begins just before the first somite is formed from the anterior end of the presomitic mesoderm (PSM) and ends after the last somite has been completed in the extending tail.

I was watching this while listening to Boards of Canada and it was quite nice

Hey everyone! Forgive me for not posting more regularly but this semesters has just been super duper busy! Anyways, Here’s a cool video of a tour of E.O Wilson’s desk at the Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology! Wooo! This guy has the one of the largest ant collections and some interesting ideas (some of which I don’t agree on) but anyways, Enjoy! 

candidscience:

Visualizing vertebrate skeletal bone formation

Mesenchyme tissue condenses to form cartilage.  The cartilage is later replaced by bone; although, there are some structures that remain permanently cartilage and do not ossify, such as the cartilage of the trachea and articular cartilage of the joints. Alcian Blue/Alizarin red staining is ideal for revealing the cartilaginous skeleton of developing embryos. The cartilaginous skeleton is stained dark blue by Alcian Blue, the bone is stained with Alizarin Red, and the other embryonic tissues are “cleared” using benzyl alcohol/benzyl benzoate (BABB). Here are some examples:

1.  Alcian blue staining of a Stage 17 BAT (Carollia perspicillata) embryo. This image was taken by Lingyu Wang and Ketty Lee.  http://thenode.biologists.com/tag/mouse/

2.  This remarkable image shows the forming skeleton of an embryonic CHICKEN, stained to differentiate between hardened bone (in red) and the still-unossified cartilage model (in blue). http://www.vetmed.vt.edu/education/curriculum/vm8304/lab_companion/histo-path/vm8054/labs/Lab8/Examples/chickbon.htm

3.  A MOUSE embryonic skeleton, with bone stained Alizarin Red and cartilage stained Alcian Blue. [Credit: Jacqueline Norrie, graduate student, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology]  http://www.utexas.edu/know/2013/09/30/science-visualized/

4.  Alcian blue staining of an advanced CORN SNAKE embryo to show the skeletal anatomy. 

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0012160609002784

5.  Alcian blue staining of a WHIPTAIL LIZARD..Image(s) by Andrea Wills (2007 Woods Hole Embryology Course)

 http://www.sdbonline.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=105

6.  The image shows the ventral surface of the SKATE RAJA prepared by alcian blue and alizarin red staining for cartilage and bone. (With additional staining of the ampullary canals surrounding the face.) It was taken by David Gold (University of California, Los Angeles), Lynn Kee (University of Michigan), and Meghan Morrissey (Duke University). http://thenode.biologists.com/skate-wins-cover-contest/photo/

7. 40-day old CAT fetus shows its cartilaginous skeleton stained with alcian blue. The specimen was also stained with alizarin red, which stainscalcium.

 http://chickscope.beckman.uiuc.edu/explore/embryology/day14/dev2.html

8. Lateral view, fetal HUMAN head (12 weeks) stained for bone (alizarin red) and cartilage (alcian blue). http://php.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php?title=File:Fetal_head_lateral.jpg

Professor John Maynard Smith (1920-2004) presents a TV version of his 1986 London Mathematical Society Popular Lecture entitled “Games Animals Play”.